~Since 2004~
A site about memories, thoughts, photos, and unrepentant opinions about motorcycles and motorcycling after four decades of twisting the throttle.

Friday, April 01, 2011

$140 Well Spent


MotoGP racing live on my 23" monitor
 Over the last couple of years I've become a bit of a fan of MotoGP racing and exactly how that happened, I couldn't say.  I used to be a NASCAR fan back in the '80s and I have no explanation for that either, I'm not even sure I should admit it and I got over it long ago.

MotoGP racing in the motorcycle world is pretty much the pinnacle of technological achievement with a motorcycle.  Some land speed bikes are faster, some drag race bikes accelerate faster, but slicing around a twisting road race course on a 230lb bike with 230+HP is a spectacle all of it's own and I've developed more than a passing interest in it.  With a 1:1 ratio of horsepower to weight, a MotoGP bike is like an F16 fighter glued to the ground but a tighter turn radius and better brakes.  Apart from the racing action itself, the visual flow and beauty of the race is mesmerizing.

Having grown weary of the claptrap, commercial ridden, over computer graphic'd coverage of the racing by Speed Channel, I decided to subscribe to the live, on-line coverage of the 2011 MotoGP race season.  If you Google the phrase "speed channel sucks" you get over eight thousand results.  Google hate+"speed channel" and you get even more.  Apparently I am not alone in my opinion of how they cover races.

via MotoGP.com

The on-line broadcast quality of the MotoGP.com coverage is 720p HD which is pretty good and looks decent on my computer monitor or on my 52" TV using the "Logitech Revue" gizmo. The picture quality sometimes goes a bit pixelated in close up shots and over all isn't quite as crisp as a regular satellite feed but it seemed good enough after I watched for a while and I stopped thinking about the slightly reduced quality.

The icing on the cake is getting to watch not only the races but the full practice sessions with no commercials whatever and no inane commentary.   Of course the commentators speak English English which can be a problem sometimes but I'll gladly miss a few things here and there for the blessing of no commercials and no behind the scenes fluff pieces.
via MotoGP.com


The on-line commentators are in fact the same guys you hear on Speed Channel but without the useless fill-in bits by some American guy.

Now you might say "But I just use the DVR and just fast forward through the commercials and dumb stuff."  Okay, I've done that too, that's half the reason for having a DVR.  But figure that in a race that typically lasts an hour, you'll miss 1/3 of the action to someone trying to sell you underarm deodorant, motorcycle insurance, flavor sugar water, + Speed Channel displaying overwrought computer graphics of motorcycle racing instead of just showing the motorcycle racing.   Imagine if every time you sat down for a bowl of ice cream your neighbor's mangy dog ran in and ate 1/3 of it.  That's Speed Channel covering motorcycle racing.

If I divide the cost of the MotoGP subscription, about $140, by 18 races with practice sessions and qualifying, the cost works out to about $1.90 per hour to watch it all, uninterrupted, and with sensible commentary.  That's pretty darned cheap over the course of a season to see the best road racing in the world in the next best way to being there in person.  Moreover, that doesn't even include watching the the other two race classes which are also part of the package.  And if you don't watch it live, they have it all saved on a "no spoiler" page so you can watch it whenever you want.

If you've been watching MotoGP on TV in the US, the on-line subscription is definitely worth it.  I just hope I can afford it for 2012 also.

6 comments:

Raftnn said...

W edont have speed channel over here, we have Sky TV, which is like cable I think. I get where you are coming from though, So who do you think will win this year? Stoner looking good, Rossi is my sentlemental favourite.

Geoff James said...

Doug,

I haven't had the misfortune of encountering the Speed Channel but we get Moto GP unfettered through Sky TV or delayed coverage on public TV. I'll say one thing.... Moto GP is light years better than Formula One cars which are an utterly boring procession. I have no idea how the whole circus survives.

I too was a fan of NASCAR in the Richard Petty days when it actually meant something. Too much like F1 now.

No Name said...

As a newcomer to motorcycling, I can only say 'those guys are nuts!'

But it looks fun.

Canajun said...

Have to agree with you on Speed Channel - their coverage of just about everything sucks.

Unfortunately I don't have high enough bandwidth to stream races live so I'll just have to deal with the inane commentary and fast forward through the commercials.

Enjoy the races!

Doug said...

The coverage of the Spanish round at Jerez convinced me yet again that the money was well spent. The only dodgey moment was when my wife asked after the race "How much did this subscription cost?"

"Uh...$1.90 and hour..."

Brady said...

You're one up on me. I've never met another motorcycle blogger. Seems like it would be interesting, but most of them are completely crazy, or am I mistaken?

At first glance, I thought that was a Cessna in your photo set. My grandfather owned the first Cessna ever produced, with serial stamp 0001, I believe. I don't know much about the particulars, I think it was a 182. The plane is discussed here:

http://new10.wordpress.com/2010/03/31/cessna-182-mr-popular/

Brady
Behind Bars - Motorcycles and Life
http://www.behindbarsmotorcycle.com/

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